HUI: Hoverboarding Under the Influence

Hold on to your hoverboards folks! California lawmakers have made it illegal to ride your hoverboards while intoxicated. While some might say that it is common logic that no one would even be able to hoverboard while drunk, the legislature, in a surprising twist, has kept up with the times.

New legislation, AB604, that was enacted this year, essentially states that you not only need to wear a helmet, but also you cannot hoverboard in public while intoxicated. The law is couched in more technical terms describing the hoverboard devices more generically to also include Segweys and motorized skateboards.

The timing of this law could not be worse for college students returning to school after winter break. Making a hoverboard look cool is difficult enough, but having to wear a helmet and carry it home from the party or the bar seems to kill any “cool” factor it might have provided its owner.

While this article has taken a light-hearted look on this new law, it is important to note that these “electrically motorized boards” can be very dangerous. The owner of the Segway company actually died in 2010 while riding a Segway, due to an accident. While the irony is more than just palatable, it is a strong reminder that as new technology becomes available, new dangers come with them. In a busy urban area, it is easy to see how someone riding on a hoverboard could get bumped, lose their balance and fall causing injury to themselves or others. If you need proof, watch Mike Tyson fall in his own home while riding one:

Fortunately, the legislature saw that the law was necessary but did not feel that punishment needed to be on the same level as driving a car under the influence. A HUI only carries a penalty of an infraction and $250 fine. An officer can however detain, arrest and require a blood alcohol test be performed. So if you are caught Hoverboarding Under the Influence, just accept the ticket, then pick up your board and walk/taxi/bus home so you can keep on rolling another day… arguing, fighting or resisting the officer is a much bigger offense than a HUI.